Indigenous brands, Maori business, Kaupapa Growth and innovation, collaborative pilot projects, culture connection and exchange, design enabled economic, culturally enriched.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Message to Maori professionals: He Whakatauki
“Hokia ki o maunga kia purea e koe I nga hau o Tawhirimatea”
Return to your ancestral mountains to be cleansed by the winds of Tawhirimatea.

Message to affiliated professionals and their professional bodies:
He whakatauki
“Ehara taku toa I te toa takitihi, engari taku toa he toa takitini”.
My achievement is not that of an individual, but is that of many. (We can achieve much together).

Limit Results

Or

Hikoi Whakakahu - Restoring the Mauri

In spring 2005, Manaaki Whenua ran a hīkoi or travelling workshop to promote and demonstrate ecological restoration in Canterbury and share knowledge, experience, inspiration and motivation amongst scientists, community groups and Māori who were involved in this area. The underlying motivation for the hīkoi was to enhance networking and relationships (whānaungatanga) between iwi, scientists and community groups via ‘hands-on’ exposure to real-life examples of ecological restoration techniques in a variety of habitats and tackling a variety of issues. The hīkoi also acted as a celebration of the success of restoration activities over the last 30 years and aimed to convey information and experiences of this work. This report reviews the hīkoi and summarises participant feedback. It also provides commentary from the project team about the lessons learned and provides a number of recommendations for consideration.

Paki Harrison: Tohunga Whakairo.

The Story of a Master Carver by Ranginui Walker. Review by Carin Wilson.

Papakainga Case Study

From February 2008 to June 2009 a trial was undertaken through a partnership between Karl Wixon of WIKI Design & Consultancy Ltd (Member of development team for the Papakainga Development Guide) and a Whānau trust seeking to develop papakainga on their whenua. The intent of the project was to progress through the ‘whanau’ and ‘whenua’ sections of the guide to the point of having a design concept and readiness for Resource Consent. The project was sponsored by Te Puni Kokiri. This Case Study documents the outcomes and ‘lessons learned’ from the 'trial' in the hope that it will assist other whânau in working their way through their Papakainga development projects, as well as providing some useful lessons for TPK, the Mâori Land Court, Territorial Authorities and development:

South-West Christchurch Area Plan - Tangata Whenua Values

This report is part of a series of preliminary, technical ‘Phase 1’ reports for the South-West Christchurch Area Plan (SWAP). Together these reports will direct what is to be protected, maintained or enhanced in the face of future land use change in the Christchurch South-West. The report was developed in conjunction with representatives from Ngāi Tuahuriri and Ngāi Te Ruahikihiki ki Taumutu. It summarises the cultural values important in South-West Christchurch; key statutory and non-statutory directions for recognising and achieving cultural values; provides information on sites and areas of significance; and recommends ways to incorporate Māori values into plans for the area.

State of the Takiwā - Te Āhuatanga o Te Ihutai

Cultural Health Asessment of the Avon-Heathcote Estuary and it's Catchment. This report outlines the results of a cultural environmental health assessment of Te Ihutai/the Avon-Heathcote Estuary and its catchment undertaken by Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, in-conjunction with members of Ngāi Tūāhuriri and Ngāti Wheke, between March and May 2007. This study was carried out for Environment Canterbury as part of a wider research project being led by the Avon-Heathcote Estuary Ihutai Trust called 'Healthy Estuary & Rivers of the City'.

Tangata Whenua me te Kainga Kanohi – Tangata Whenua Narrative in Strategic Planning.

This case study is directed at Local and Regional government and proposes the capturing of indigenous culture and Tangata Whenua narratives as a key part of best practice in planning and design. The proposal developed by staff from Manukau City Council is specifically directed at informing the development of a Regional Spatial Plan and District Plan for the new Auckland unitary council and has wider relevance for enhancing a range of local government planning processes across Aotearoa / New Zealand.

Te Hira Whanau – Bach 101: Vision for More Sustainable Housing

This case study documents the restoration of the Te Hira Whanau Bach, one of only 34 remaining on Rangitoto Island (Hauraki Gulf), by Te Hononga – The Māori design studio located in the Unitec NZ Department of Architecture, in collaboration with the Te Hira Whanau. This exercise highlights the notion of cultural sustainability as well as the sustainability of the unique Rangitoto Bach typology and was undertaken as part of the inaugural Sustainable Habitat Challenge (SHaC 09) receiving commendations for ‘Vision’ and ‘Client collaboration’.

Te Kaupapa o Te Whare - House of Tahu Cultural Sustainability Assessment

A report outlining cultural sustainability recommendations for the final design of the house of Tahu.

Tu Whare Ora - Building Capacity for Maori Driven Design in Sustainable Settlement Development

The "Tu Whare Ora - Building Capacity for Māori Driven Design in Sustainable Settlement Development" project seeks to address the growing desire among Māori to be more active in developing living environments for their people and the overall settlement patterns of their respective rohe.

Te Hira Whanau - Bach 101: Vision for More Sustainable Housing

This case study documents the restoration of the Te Hira Whanau Bach, one of only 34 remaining on Rangitoto Island (Hauraki Gulf), by Te Hononga – The Māori design studio located in the Unitec NZ Department of Architecture, in collaboration with the Te Hira Whanau. This exercise highlights the notion of cultural sustainability as well as the sustainability of the unique Rangitoto Bach typology and was undertaken as part of the inaugural Sustainable Habitat Challenge (SHaC 09) receiving commendations for ‘Vision’ and ‘Client collaboration’.

Protecting Canadian First Nations and Maori Heritage through Conventional Legal Means

IPinCH Associate Deidre Brown (University of Auckland) presented a paper co-authored with Project Director George Nicholas (Simon Fraser University) at “New Zealand and Canada: Connections, Comparisons and Challenges” Conference in Wellington, New Zealand, February 9-10, 2010. Protecting Canadian First Nations and Maori Heritage through Conventional Legal Means, discusses success and failures of the Western legal system around the protection of Indigenous cultural heritage. This conference presentation will be developed into an article for publication with additional input from IPinCH legal scholars and researchers with a special interest in commodification and appropriation of art and artistic traditions.

The garden of knowledge

My masters thesis in architecture focusing on the development of bastion point with papakainga housing. a not to heavy read. enjoy.

Ngā Aho - Venice Bienalle 2016. NZ exhibition article

A shot history of Ngā Aho. "Māori are committed to working towards reinstating and developing a physical and metaphysical understanding of cultural landscape within contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand. In January 2007 a set of guiding principles – the Te Aranga Principles – was developed by Māori professionals and supporters spanning many areas of design, arts, health, education, local and central government. The principles assert that “the development and articulation of the Māori cultural landscape will contribute to the health and well-being of all who reside in and visit Aotearoa – through realising our unique Aotearoa and Pacific identity.”

The Future of Māori Planning

Lena Henry BPlan (Hons) MPlan(Hons) Papa Pounamu Hui 2017 Kāinga, Kounga, Kaitiakitanga • Māori communities have strong and varied interests in better urban planning. • A better urban planning system needs to recognise planning based on mātauranga Māori. • Better urban planning must focus on holistic outcomes. • The existing planning framework does not deliver outcomes for Māori communities. • There is a lack of guidance and capacity. • Kaitiakitanga is more than ‘preservation’. • Rangatiratanga is more than ‘consultation

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