Indigenous brands, Maori business, Kaupapa Growth and innovation, collaborative pilot projects, culture connection and exchange, design enabled economic, culturally enriched.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The fabric of the Maori cultural landscape includes all physical and spiritual dimensions of whanau, hapu and iwi as expressed in our living environments - our whenua, kainga, whare and public spaces. Kaitiaki, designers and Territorial Authorities play a key role in the development, articulation and sustainability of cultural landscapes.

The fabric of the Maori cultural landscape includes all physical and spiritual dimensions of whanau, hapu and iwi as expressed in our living environments - our whenua, kainga, whare and public spaces. Kaitiaki, designers and Territorial Authorities play a key role in the development, articulation and sustainability of cultural landscapes.

As kaitiaki, the mana whenua have a custodial responsibility for places of cultural significance - such as marae, urupa, wahi tapu and mahinga kai - as well as having a responsibility for all public spaces and spaces in private ownership, particularly where development may threaten the well-being of the wider environment.

Mana Whenua Iwi, hapu and whanau will be the ultimate drivers and shapers of any Cultural Landscape Strategy implemented within their tribal domain.

From the 16th to the 19th of November 2006 a hui of Maori professionals and supporters spanning architecture, landscape architecture, planning, engineering, design, iwi / hapu development, education, arts and local & central government, gathered with the hau kainga at Te Aranga Marae in Flaxmere to discuss and formulate a draft National Maori Cultural Landscape Strategy.

Following on from the Urban Design Protocol released by the Ministry for the Environment in 2005, and outcomes of a preliminary hui in June 2006, this strategy seeks to ensure iwi are well placed to positively influence and shape the design of cultural landscapes within their tribal boundaries.

The first draft of the strategy and a plan for it's implementation were completed in January of 2007. July 2007 saw a hui convened at Apumoana Marae in Rotorua entitled ‘Designing Maori Futures' to progress the establishment of a Society of Maori professionals to progress aspects of the strategy - it secured 25 founding members and a further 28 registrations of interest to join. Between August 2007 and February 2008 the strategy was taken out for Iwi consultation through eight hui from Te Tai Tokerau to Murihiku and gained unanimous support.

 

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